Hash oil seized in the 1970s had a THC content ranging from 10% to 30%. The oil available on the U.S. West Coast in 1974 averaged about 15% THC.[2] Samples seized across the United States by the Drug Enforcement Administration over an 18-year period (1980–1997) showed that THC content in hashish and hashish oil averaging 12.9% and 17.4%, respectively, did not show an increase over time.[4] The highest THC concentrations measured were 52.9% in hashish and 47.0% in hash oil.[5] Hash oils in use in the 2010s had THC concentrations as high as 90%[6][7] and other products achieving higher concentrations [8]
www.CureYourOwnCancer.org© 2011-2017 - FDA Disclaimer: The statements on this site have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Individual results may vary. Always consult with your doctor before starting any treatment. Content on this site is no way to be considered professional medical advice; they are opinions. Unless otherwise stated, none of the authors are valid medical professionals. This site is for educational purposes only! We encourage you to use the information and links on this site with your doctor.
Laboratory evidence indicated that cannabidiol may reduce THC clearance, increasing plasma concentrations which may raise THC availability to receptors and enhance its effect in a dose-dependent manner.[23][24] In vitro, cannabidiol inhibited receptors affecting the activity of voltage-dependent sodium and potassium channels, which may affect neural activity.[25] A small clinical trial reported that CBD partially inhibited the CYP2C-catalyzed hydroxylation of THC to 11-OH-THC.[26]
Anna Syreeni, Niina Sandholm, Jingjing Cao, Iiro Toppila, David M. Maahs, Marian J. Rewers, Janet K. Snell-Bergeon, Tina Costacou, Trevor J. Orchard, M. Luiza Caramori, Michael Mauer, Barbara E.K. Klein, Ronald Klein, Erkka Valo, Maija Parkkonen, Carol Forsblom, Valma Harjutsalo, Andrew D. Paterson, for the DCCT/EDIC Research Group and Per-Henrik Groop, on behalf of the FinnDiane Study Group
While many dietary recommendations have been proposed to reduce cancer risks, the evidence to support them is not definitive.[14][101] The primary dietary factors that increase risk are obesity and alcohol consumption. Diets low in fruits and vegetables and high in red meat have been implicated but reviews and meta-analyses do not come to a consistent conclusion.[102][103] A 2014 meta-analysis find no relationship between fruits and vegetables and cancer.[104] Coffee is associated with a reduced risk of liver cancer.[105] Studies have linked excess consumption of red or processed meat to an increased risk of breast cancer, colon cancer and pancreatic cancer, a phenomenon that could be due to the presence of carcinogens in meats cooked at high temperatures.[106][107] In 2015 the IARC reported that eating processed meat (e.g., bacon, ham, hot dogs, sausages) and, to a lesser degree, red meat was linked to some cancers.[108][109]
Hash oil, also known as honey oil or cannabis oil, is an oleoresin obtained by the extraction of cannabis or hashish. It is a concentrated form of the plant containing many of its resins and terpenes – in particular, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), and other cannabinoids. There are various extraction methods, most involving a solvent, such as butane or ethanol. Hash oil is usually consumed by smoking, vaporizing or eating. Hash oil may be sold in cartridges used with pen vaporizers. Preparations of hash oil may be solid or colloidal depending on both production method and temperature and are usually identified by their appearance or characteristics. Range of color, most commonly golden to light brown, can vary from transparent to yellow, to tan or black, this mainly depends on the method of preparation and solvent, if the solvent also reacts with plant material and chlorophyll, the oil procured would not yellow coloured, it would be green instead.. Cannabis retailers in California have reported about 40% of their sales are from cannabis oils.[1]
Cancer has existed for all of human history.[183] The earliest written record regarding cancer is from circa 1600 BC in the Egyptian Edwin Smith Papyrus and describes breast cancer.[183] Hippocrates (c. 460 BC – c. 370 BC) described several kinds of cancer, referring to them with the Greek word καρκίνος karkinos (crab or crayfish).[183] This name comes from the appearance of the cut surface of a solid malignant tumor, with "the veins stretched on all sides as the animal the crab has its feet, whence it derives its name".[184] Galen stated that "cancer of the breast is so called because of the fancied resemblance to a crab given by the lateral prolongations of the tumor and the adjacent distended veins".[185]:738 Celsus (c. 25 BC – 50 AD) translated karkinos into the Latin cancer, also meaning crab and recommended surgery as treatment.[183] Galen (2nd century AD) disagreed with the use of surgery and recommended purgatives instead.[183] These recommendations largely stood for 1000 years.[183]
Cancer - the Brave Crab Sent to this Earth by something they believe in, only to mess with someone bigger than they are, this isn't an animal aware of their strength. Patriotism can make them endanger their own wellbeing, fighting for someone else's cause, as if others can become their higher power. The Crab knows where they're going, but this is often in a wrong direction, at least until they learn their lessons and start relying solely on themselves.

In 2015, about 90.5 million people had cancer.[6] About 14.1 million new cases occur a year (not including skin cancer other than melanoma).[11] It caused about 8.8 million deaths (15.7% of deaths).[7] The most common types of cancer in males are lung cancer, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer and stomach cancer.[19] In females, the most common types are breast cancer, colorectal cancer, lung cancer and cervical cancer.[11] If skin cancer other than melanoma were included in total new cancer cases each year, it would account for around 40% of cases.[20][21] In children, acute lymphoblastic leukemia and brain tumors are most common, except in Africa where non-Hodgkin lymphoma occurs more often.[18] In 2012, about 165,000 children under 15 years of age were diagnosed with cancer.[19] The risk of cancer increases significantly with age, and many cancers occur more commonly in developed countries.[11] Rates are increasing as more people live to an old age and as lifestyle changes occur in the developing world.[22] The financial costs of cancer were estimated at $1.16 trillion USD per year as of 2010.[23]


Since most forms of arthritis are inherited to some degree, there is no real way to prevent them. Arthritis that follows joint injury could be prevented by adhering to safety regulations and trying to avoid becoming injured. Arthritis related to infection (for examples, septic arthritis, reactive arthritis, Whipple's disease) could be prevented by not becoming infected with the causative organism. The extent to which this is possible varies depending upon the individual condition.
Cancer - the Brave Crab Sent to this Earth by something they believe in, only to mess with someone bigger than they are, this isn't an animal aware of their strength. Patriotism can make them endanger their own wellbeing, fighting for someone else's cause, as if others can become their higher power. The Crab knows where they're going, but this is often in a wrong direction, at least until they learn their lessons and start relying solely on themselves.

A wealth of marketing material, blogs and anecdotes claim that cannabis oils can cure whatever ails you, even cancer. But the limited research doesn't suggest that cannabis oil should take the place of conventional medication, except for in two very rare forms of epilepsy (and even then, it's recommended only as a last-resort treatment). And, experts caution that because cannabis oil and other cannabis-based products are not regulated or tested for safety by the government or any third-party agency, it's difficult for consumers to know exactly what they're getting.

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